Kitamu Latham Sampier Kitamu Latham Sampier

Illustration

  • Appearances Can Be Deceptive

    Appearances Can Be Deceptive

  • RED

    RED

  • Remains of A Life Lost

    Remains of A Life Lost

  • Gothabilly Femme Fatale

    Gothabilly Femme Fatale

  • BACK FROM THE DEAD - Label Concept

    BACK FROM THE DEAD - Label Concept

  • Gardenias

    Gardenias

  • Thrill Me - MJ Tribute

    Thrill Me - MJ Tribute

  • Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Tribute Poster

    Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Tribute Poster

  • Rockabilly Venus

    Rockabilly Venus

  • Bijou Corbeau for (not yet Titled)

    Bijou Corbeau for (not yet Titled)

  • Breast Cancer Awareness

    Breast Cancer Awareness

  • To Be Announced

    To Be Announced

  • Fashion Illustration - Astec Inspired

    Fashion Illustration - Astec Inspired

  • Fashion Illustration - Egyptian Inspired

    Fashion Illustration - Egyptian Inspired

  • Chalice Serrano Portrait

    Chalice Serrano Portrait

  • The Dancer In Me

    The Dancer In Me

    Written by Stephanie Butler Adams

    Published by Xulon Press
    http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781628713244&HC_ISBN=9781628713251
  • The Dancer In Me

    The Dancer In Me

    Written by Stephanie Butler Adams

    Published by Xulon Press
    http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781628713244&HC_ISBN=9781628713251
  • Ameno Uzume Shines

    Ameno Uzume Shines

    Ame-no-Uzume-no-mikoto (天宇受売命, 天鈿女命?) is the goddess of dawn, mirth and revelry in the Shinto religion of Japan, and the wife of fellow-god Sarutahiko Ōkami.

    She famously relates to the tale of the missing sun deity, Amaterasu Omikami.

    Amaterasu's brother, the storm god Susano'o, had vandalized her rice fields, threw a flayed horse at her loom, and brutally killed one of her maidens due to a quarrel between them. In turn, Amaterasu became furious with him and retreated into the Heavenly Rock Cave, Amano-Iwato. The world, without the illumination of the sun, became dark and the gods could not lure Amaterasu out of her hiding place.

    The clever Uzume overturned a tub near the cave entrance and began a dance on it, tearing off her clothing in front of the other deities. They considered this so comical that they laughed heartily at the sight.[3] This dance is said to have founded the Japanese ritual dance, Kagura. [4]

    Amaterasu heard them, and peered out to see what all the fuss was about. When she opened the cave, she saw her glorious reflection in a mirror which Uzume had placed on a tree, and slowly emerged from her hiding spot.

    At that moment, the god Ame-no-Tajikarawo-no-mikoto dashed forth and closed the cave behind her, refusing to budge so that she could no longer retreat. Another god tied a magic shimenawa across the entrance.[5] The deities Ame-no-Koyane-no-mikoto and Ame-no-Futodama-no-mikoto then asked Amaterasu to rejoin the divine.

    She agreed, and light was restored to the earth.